Supporting the future of art:
The Rembrandt Club Summer Research Grant

One of the Club’s most important and long-standing traditions is our support for Pomona College Art Students. We began giving them small grants back in 1937 and have continued the practice (and enlarged the grant amounts) through the years thanks to funds raised through member dues, fundraisers, and gifts.

Currently we give Summer Research Grants to one or two Pomona College art students annually for research and travels to complete their senior thesis. Pomona’s Studio Art and Art History faculty recommend the students, and those selected describe their previous summer’s research in one of the first Rembrandt lectures of the academic year. Their fascinating topics have ranged from Neon Sign Making, UK Sexuality and Visual Culture, Creating Social Space through Pie Making, Italian Baroque Images of Africans, and more.

The 2015 Grant winners were Studio Art major Sana Javeri Kadri and Art History major Daisy Adams. Both of their presentations were outstanding.

Sana Javeri Kadri

Sana Javeri Kadri

The Art of Food Justice, Sustainability, Community, Social Practice, and Other Big Words

Javeri Kadri presentation was a pictorial journey to the more than 20 sustainable farms, food co-ops, sustainable food systems research sites, food and art spaces, and sustainable farms and restaurants, and filmmakers of these issues that she spent the summer visiting throughout the U.S.  A visual Arts and Environmental Analysis double major, as well as an extremely talented photographer, Javeri Kadri is attempting to use art and media techniques to address environmental and food justice issues.

 

Daisy Adams

Daisy Adams

“Beautiful, Useful, Enduring”: Clara Barck Welles, the Kalo Shop, and the Arts & Crafts Movement in Chicago

Adams presented her research on Arts and Crafts silversmith Clara Barck Welles and the Kalo Shop, Welles’ workshop and store in Chicago, focusing on Welles’ contributions to the Arts and Crafts style of Chicago and her advocacy on behalf of women. Adams presentation included highlights from her summer stints at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, including its Kalo Shop collection and at the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art’s library and display of Kalo Shop hollowware; the Art Institute of Chicago and the Chicago History Museum, where she saw many of Welles’ original drawings, an exhibition of Arts and Crafts jewelry at the Driehaus Museum, to see Kalo Shop jewelry; and Park Ridge, Illinois, a suburb of Chicago, where Welles established an Arts and Crafts school and workshop in 1907.

 

Click here for a list of previous Grant Winners. A number of these students have gone on to become nationally and internationally famous artists and art scholars.